Saturday, March 31, 2012

Dental erosive wear and salivary flow rate in physically active young adults

Aida Mulic, Anne Bjorg Tveit, Dag Songe, Hanne Sivertsen and Anne B Skaare

BMC Oral Health 2012, 12:8 doi:10.1186/1472-6831-12-8
Published: 23 March 2012

Abstract (provisional)

Background

Little attention has been directed towards identifying the relationship between physical exercise, dental erosive wear and salivary secretion. The study aimed i) to describe the prevalence and severity of dental erosive wear among a group of physically active young adults, ii) to describe the patterns of dietary consumption and lifestyle among these individuals and iii) to study possible effect of exercise on salivary flow rate.

Methods

Young members (age range 18-32 years) of a fitness-centre were invited to participate in the study. Inclusion criteria were healthy young adults training hard at least twice a week. A non-exercising comparison group was selected from an ongoing study among 18-year-olds. Two hundred and twenty participants accepted an intraoral examination and completed a questionnaire. Seventy of the exercising participants provided saliva samples. The examination was performed at the fitness-centre or at a dental clinic (comparison group), using tested erosive wear system (VEDE). Saliva sampling (unstimulated and stimulated) was performed before and after exercise. Occlusal surfaces of the first molars in both jaws and the labial and palatal surfaces of the upper incisors and canines were selected as index teeth.

Results

Dental erosive wear was registered in 64% of the exercising participants, more often in the older age group, and in 20% of the comparison group. Enamel lesions were most observed in the upper central incisors (33%); dentine lesions in lower first molar (27%). One fourth of the participants had erosive wear into dentine, significantly more in males than in females (p = 0.047). More participants with erosive wear had decreased salivary flow during exercise compared with the non-erosion group (p < 0.01). The stimulated salivary flow rate was in the lower rage ([less than or equal to] 1 ml/min) among more than one third of the participants, and more erosive lesions were registered than in subjects with higher flow rates (p < 0.01).

Conclusion

The study showed that a high proportion of physically active young adults have erosive lesions and indicate that hard exercise and decreased stimulated salivary flow rate may be associated with such wear.

Friday, March 30, 2012

What causes Durability Reduction in Tooth-colored Resin Restorations?

J Contemp Dent Pract. 2012 Jan 1;13(1):i-ii.

Botta SB.

Source

Department of Restorative Dentistry Assistant Professor, Camilo Castelo Branco University São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

Despite its common use, the dental resins still have a lower durability when compared to amalgam restorations and indirect restorations. Success in adhesive dentistry involves long lasting restorations; however, the resin-dentine interface degradation appears as the biggest obstacle to achieve this goal. Independent of the adhesive strategy used for bonding to tooth substrates (self-etch or etch-and-rinse adhesive systems) degradation of the hybrid layer can be observed. It should be emphasized that the lower durability of restorations results from degradation of the bonded interfaces formed by the adhesive systems (Hashimoto, 2010), being more apparent when dentin is the major bonding substrate involved. According to the strategic plan on tooth-colored resin restorations (NIDCR, 2009-2013), its durability is approximately 6 years. Considering that the dentist spends about 50 to 70% of their clinical time only for replacing this composite resin restorations (Ericson et al, 2007), this yields an annual cost (US only) of approximately $5 billion (Jokstad et al, 2001). What causes this reduction in the durability of tooth-colored resin restorations? The reduction in the durability of adhesive restorations is directly related with the balance between the resinous components of the adhesive system and components from organic substrate which can lead to dental degradation of adhesive interface. This degradation occurs in two ways: Either by hydrolysis of the resin components or by hydrolysis of the collagen matrix. Being the main causes, the incomplete infiltration of resin monomers, the hydrolytic degradation of adhesive system polymer by water sorption, and the breakdown of collagen fibrils by MMP and cathepsin-cysteine. The increased concentration of hydrophilic monomers (e.g. HEMA) in both self-etch or etch-and-rinse adhesive systems leave the adhesive film permeable to water. This water may arise from pulpal pressure of dentinal tubules (Bresch et al, 2008) or remnants of water molecules that do not evaporated with the solvent (alcohol or acetone). Aside from the presence of water at the base of hybrid layer, the interfibrillar spaces of collagen in apatite-depleted dentin also contain hydrated negatively charged proteoglycans that form a hydrogel (Scott and Thomlinson, 1998). If these hydrogels remain hydrated in interfibrillar spaces, they may be responsible for 'molecular sieving' of larger hydrophobic dimethacrylates (like BisGMA-bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate), allowing only smaller hydrophilic molecules (like HEMA- 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) to permeate upon the bottom of the hybrid layers. Hydrophilic resin monomers (like HEMA) are vulnerable to hydrolysis, due to the presence of ester linkages (Ferracane, 2006). Hydrolysis of monomer methacrylates ester bonds can be caused either by the increase in acidity of monomer components in self-etch adhesive systems (Aida et al, 2009) or by salivary esterases (Shokati et al, 2010) that can break covalent bonds between the methacrylate polymers by the addition of water molecules to the ester bonds. Thus, the plasticization and nano-phase separation of polymers decreases the dynamic mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives (Park et al, 2010) and increases their susceptibility to esterase-catalyzed hydrolysis (Kostoryz et al, 2009). Mineralized dentin contains matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-2, 3, 8, and 9 (Birkedal-Hansen et al, 1993). Due to dentin mineralization process, the MMPs are retained in the collagen extracellular matrix as inactive proenzymes in a latent state (Tjaderhane et al, 1998). However, MMPs can be activated if, for some reason, the demineralized dentin is exposed to acid, such as monomers of etch-and-rinse (Mazzoni et al, 2006) and self-etch adhesive systems (Nishitani et al, 2006a). When activated, the MMPs act in the degradation of collagen, elastin and extracellular matrix components (Birkedal-Hansen et al, 1993). Thus, apatite-depleted, resin-sparse collagen fibrils within the hybrid layers become susceptible to degradation, compromising the longevity of resin-dentin bonds (Breschi et al, 2008; Hashimoto, 2010). Another extracellular enzyme present in dentin is the cysteine cathepsins. They have recently been reported to be present in intact dentin (Tersariol et al, 2010) and more abundantly (approximately 10-fold) in carious dentin (Nascimento and Tjäderhane, unpublished observations). They are derived from the dental pulp via the dentinal fluid (Tersariol et al, 2010) and, similar to MMPs, may be activated in mildly acidic environments, produced by both etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Adhesive technology has evolved rapidly since it was introduced more than 60 years ago. The main challenge for dental adhesives is to provide an equally effective bond to two hard tissues of different nature. The contemporary dentin adhesive is not as durable as we had assumed. The complete replacement of free and loosely bound water within the apatite-depleted collagen fibrils within the hybrid layers and the inactivation of collagenolytic enzymes appear to be the main objectives to improve durability of tooth-colored resin restorations.

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Near-UV laser treatment of extrinsic dental enamel stains

This research looks promising on removing stain from teeth using a laser. MJ

 

Schoenly, J., Seka, W., Featherstone, J. and Rechmann, P. (2012), Near-UV laser treatment of extrinsic dental enamel stains. Lasers Surg. Med.. doi: 10.1002/lsm.22017

Abstract

Background and Objectives

The selective ablation of extrinsic dental enamel stains using a 400-nm laser is evaluated at several fluences for completely removing stains with minimal damage to the underlying enamel.

Study Design/Materials and Methods

A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser (400-nm wavelength, 60-nanosecond pulse duration, 10-Hz repetition rate) was used to treat 10 extracted human teeth with extrinsic enamel staining. Each tooth was irradiated perpendicular to the surface in a back-and-forth motion over a 1-mm length using an ∼300-µm-diam 10th-order super-Gaussian beam with fluences ranging from 0.8 to 6.4 J/cm2. Laser triangulation determined stain depth and volume removed by measuring 3D surface images before and after irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy evaluated the surface roughness of enamel following stain removal. Fluorescence spectroscopy measured spectra of unbleached and photobleached stains in the spectral range of 600–800 nm.

Results

Extrinsic enamel stains are removed with laser fluences between 0.8 and 6.4 J/cm2. Stains removed on sound enamel leave behind a smooth enamel surface. Stain removal in areas with signs of earlier cariogenic acid attacks resulted in isolated and randomly located laser-induced, 50-µm-diam enamel pits. These pits contain 0.5-µm diam, smooth craters indicative of heat transfer from the stain to the enamel and subsequent melting and water droplet ejection. Ablation stalling of enamel stains is typically observed at low fluences (<3 J/cm2) and is accompanied by a drastic reduction in porphyrin fluorescence from the Soret band.

Conclusion

Laser ablation of extrinsic enamel stains at 400 nm is observed to be most efficient above 3 J/cm2 with minimal damage to the underlying enamel. Unsound underlying enamel is also observed to be selectively removed after irradiation. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

HENRY SCHEIN PRACTICE SOLUTIONS LAUNCHES DENTRIX® G5

New version of Dentrix® is now an 'open platform' for running applications that integrate directly with the Dentrix database

MELVILLE, N.Y., March 27, 2012 - Henry Schein Inc. (NASDAQ: HSIC), the largest provider of health care products and services to dental, medical and animal health office-based practitioners, today announced the launch of Dentrix® G5, a new version of the Dentrix practice management system. Dentrix G5 includes new features, the largest of which is a new database architecture which not only improves performance, but also allows Dentrix to become an "open platform" for enabling other dental applications and technology to link directly into Dentrix.
"Just like the Apple iPhone is a platform for thousands of iPhone applications, Dentrix G5 is now a platform for Dentrix-integrated applications," said Kevin Bunker, President, Henry Schein Practice Solutions. "Dentists will be able to use Dentrix G5-connected versions of their favorite applications that will access the database or become a new feature of Dentrix."

"Dentrix G5 will further enhance practice efficiency by enabling a multitude of integrated applications to share data and functionality with Dentrix, effectively creating one digital office solution," said Steve Roberts, Director of Product Strategy at Henry Schein Practice Solutions.
The move to make Dentrix G5 an open platform for third-party applications was made possible by its new SQL database with encryption that improves performance while adding advanced security to patient data.

To support the many developers writing for the Dentrix platform, Henry Schein launched the Dentrix Developer Program, which provides software developers with tools and a certification program for developing applications that work with Dentrix G5. "More than 37 developers are now writing Dentrix-compatible applications that read from and, in some cases, write data directly to the Dentrix database," Roberts added. "We also have dozens more who are in the process of joining the Dentrix Developer Program. This means dentists will soon see a multitude of Dentrix-integrated applications that improve their use of Dentrix and build out their digital dental office."

Once developers certify their Dentrix application in the developer program, they can add a new "Dentrix G5 Connected" logo on their marketing materials, said Michael Allsop, Director of Marketing for Henry Schein Practice Solutions. "The Dentrix G5 Connected logo helps Dentrix users easily identify applications designed for their system, and they can purchase with confidence knowing that the G5 Connected product will not only work with G5, but also with subsequent upgrades to Dentrix." All Dentrix G5 Connected applications will also be showcased on the Dentrix.com website, Allsop added.

Other new features in Dentrix G5 include the Electronic Explanation of Benefits (eEOB), which allows practices to receive, review and automatically record insurance payments and adjustments for claims submitted electronically using the Dentrix eClaims software.  Insurance claims are now validated pre-submission and the User is prompted to include attachments on insurance claims for carriers that require them through eClaims Attachment Notifications, thereby reducing rejected or pended claims. The new Screen Capture utility allows users to drag over any part of the visible screen to create a new document and save it to the Document Center, a particularly helpful feature for creating claims attachments from third-party imaging systems.  Dentrix Dentalink provides secure instant messaging, enabling users to easily communicate throughout the office with minimal disruption to patient care and workflow.

The new Dentrix Mobile upgrade is an add-on product that presents an improved interface designed specifically for Apple iPad™ and Motorola Xoom™ tablet users.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Eco-Friendly Orthodontist in Maryland Helps Patients Save Nearly 300 Thousand Gallons of Water

Dr. Mary Trahar has helped 200 patients save water by reminding them to turn off the tap when they brush

Annapolis, MD (March 22, 2012) Dr. Mary C. Trahar of Annapolis, Maryland wins the Eco-Dentistry Association’s World Water Day Challenge, encouraging patients to turn off the tap while brushing their teeth to save 90 glasses of clean, drinkable water every day. In addition to having the highest number of submissions for the challenge, Dr. Trahar has signed up a cumulative 200 patients for the Eco-Dentistry Association’s “Save 90 a Day!” campaign to date. This represents saving an aggregate of roughly 300,000 gallons of clean, drinkable water each year, or enough to fill approximately 15 mid-sized swimming pools.

The Eco-Dentistry Association offered the World Water Day Contest as a challenge for every one of its 700 members to sign up as many patients as possible for the “Save 90 a Day!” campaign, which began in 2010 as a way to educate the public on the water savings achieved by turning off the tap while brushing. Joining the campaign is free, no special equipment is required, and anyone with access to a computer can participate.

In addition to creating the “Save 90 a Day!” campaign, the Eco-Dentistry Association promotes World Water Day as a way to raise awareness on water conservation and remind dental professionals of the powerful role they play in changing patient behavior through education. “By pledging to ‘Save 90 a Day!’ and encouraging other to do the same, we can create a major positive impact on conserving water, one of Earth’s most precious resources and one without which we could not practice modern dentistry,” says EDA co-founder Ina Pockrass.
Beyond helping patients reduce their water footprint, Dr. Trahar’s office has effectively educated patients on its own eco-friendly initiatives as well as steps that each individual patient can take to live a greener life. The green office has chosen to implement environmentally friendly techniques, procedures and materials in order to reduce waste and pollution, conserve energy and water, and recycle when possible; while promoting individual health and wellness for its patients.
About the EDA

The EDA offers dental professionals’ practical tips on incorporating eco-friendly dental methods and practices, and offers the public access to dental professionals that share their values of wellness and environmental stewardship. The organization was co-founded by Dr. Fred Pockrass, a dentist, and his entrepreneur wife, Ina Pockrass, who together created the model for eco-friendly dentistry, and operate their own award-winning dental practice in Berkeley, California, the first in the country to be certified as a green business. They formed the organization to stimulate a movement in the dental industry to employ environmentally-sound practices, like reducing waste and pollution, saving energy, water and money, incorporating wellness-based methods and the best technological advances in dentistry.
More information can be found at www.ecodentistry.org

Monday, March 26, 2012

Carestream Dental Launches the CS 9300 and CS 9300C in Canada



Versatile Extraoral Systems Offering High-Quality Panoramic, 3D and Cephalometric Imaging Receive Approval for Sale in Canada

TORONTO – Carestream Dental today launched sales of its CS 9300 and CS 9300C extraoral imaging systems in Canada. Both imaging systems provide exceptional image quality and ultimate practice flexibility, covering a wide scope of clinical needs.

The CS 9300 offers 2D digital panoramic imaging with variable focal trough technology. Additionally, the CS 9300 features 3D imaging with up to seven selectable fields of view, ranging from 5 cm x 5 cm to 17 cm x 13.5 cm. The ability to adapt the field of view when using the CS 9300 enables practitioners to use the system for their specific diagnostic needs – whether conducting an assessment of the maxillofacial complex using a larger field of view or evaluating a single impaction with a focused field scan.

In addition to panoramic and 3D imaging, the CS 9300C produces best-in-class cephalometric images in a single shot, which minimizes distortion and risk of blurred images due to patient movement. Offering the broadest range of image formats from 24 cm x 30 cm to 18 cm x 18 cm, the CS 9300C’s cephalometric module addresses any orthodontic diagnostic and tracing need and even includes an exclusive full cranial option.

Recognized for its exceptionally high degree of precision, the CS 9300C is one of a handful of advanced 3D imaging systems that is certified by OraMetrix Inc. for use with its SureSmile® technology. This integration with SureSmile means orthodontists will have improved treatment planning as well as unprecedented control of treatment.

“For practitioners who have been waiting to integrate cone beam computed tomography into their practice, the CS 9300 and CS 9300C provide everything they need in one, space-saving system,” said Edward Shellard, D.M.D., chief marketing officer and director of business development for Carestream Dental. “What’s more, in light of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care recently approving the sale of CBCT in the province, Carestream Dental stands ready to partner with oral health professionals in Canada to install, train and support the technology in their practices.”

Both the cephalometric and 3D imaging modalities enable practitioners to limit radiation exposure by collimating the imaging area down to a precise region of interest. This supports practitioners adhering to the ALARA Principle, or “As Low as Reasonably Achievable,” which dictates that every precaution should be taken to minimize radiation exposure for patients.

“The CS 9300 and CS 9300C will redefine clinicians’ expectations of excellence as they become more confident in their treatment plans and are able to deliver fast, accurate results for enhanced patient communication,” Dr. Shellard said. “The units also enable oral health professionals to perform a wider range of diagnoses and treatments from their own office, without the need to refer patients to other imaging centers.”

In addition to their multiple imaging options, the CS 9300 and CS 9300C provide a streamlined user interface and computer control system that make exams quick and simple. The systems come pre-installed with Carestream Dental’s industry-leading imaging software that has been designed by clinicians, for clinicians. Users maximize their time spent capturing images, as the system automatically positions to the region of interest depending on the program selected; laser beams and motorized movement deliver precise alignment; and preview image “scout” technology lets you evaluate patient positioning before 3D acquisition. The system’s open design makes exams comfortable for patients, and with both standing and seated options available, it accommodates patients of all sizes.

For more information on the CS 9300 or CS 9300C, or to request a product demonstration, call (800) 944-6365 or visit www.carestreamdental.com.

About Carestream Dental
Carestream Dental provides industry-leading imaging, software and practice management solutions for dental and oral health professionals. With more than 100 years of industry experience, Carestream Dental products are used by seven out of 10 practitioners globally and deliver more precise diagnoses, improved workflows and superior patient care. For more information or to contact a Carestream Dental representative, call (800) 944-6365 or visit www.carestreamdental.com.

About Carestream Health
Carestream Health is a worldwide provider of dental and medical imaging systems and healthcare IT solutions; molecular imaging systems for life science research and drug discovery/development; X-ray film and digital X-ray systems for non-destructive testing; and advanced materials for the precision films and electronics markets.

For more information about the company’s broad portfolio of products, solutions and services, please contact your Carestream Health representative or visit www.carestream.com.

Saturday, March 24, 2012

Full U.S. House Approves Amendment Repealing Insurance Industry's Antitrust Exemption

The U.S. House of Representatives this morning approved by voice vote an amendment that would repeal the McCarran-Ferguson Act's antitrust exemption as it applies to health insurance companies. That exemption, which Congress enacted in 1945, was intended to make it easier for states to regulate insurance without federal interference. The ADA and other health care groups have long argued that the exemption gives the insurance industry an unfair advantage in the marketplace. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-Ariz.) offered his legislation as a floor amendment to the ADA-supported Help Efficient, Accessible, Low-cost, Timely Healthcare Act (H.R. 5).
H.R. 5, which would reform medical malpractice laws by limiting awards and attorney fees, passed the House today by a vote of 223 to 181.

Friday, March 23, 2012

Facebook Timeline Tutorial

If you have not changed your Facebook page to the timeline format there is short time left to do it. Otherwise Facebook will be doing it for you. Lanmark 360 has produced this video to help you transition into Facebook's new Timeline format easily and quickly.

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Immediate Loading in Mandible Full-Arch: Pilot Study in Patients With Osteoporosis in Bisphosphonate Therapy

This is the type of research I love finding as it has a direct impact on patient treatment. MJ

Alessandro Leonida, Paolo Vescovi, Marco Baldoni, Gabriele Rossi, and Dorina Lauritano (2012) Immediate Loading in Mandible Full-Arch: Pilot Study in Patients With Osteoporosis in Bisphosphonate Therapy. Journal of Oral Implantology: February 2012, Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 85-94.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Poor dental hygiene puts congenital heart disease patients at risk of further heart damage

Copenhagen, 16 March 2012: Poor dental hygiene behaviours in patients with congenital heart disease are increasing their risk of endocarditis. Teens with congenital heart disease floss, brush and visit the dentist less than their peers. But they have healthier behaviours when it comes to alcohol, cigarettes and illicit drugs. Adults with single ventricle physiology (a type of congenital heart disease) also have poorer dental hygiene practices than their peers despite having better health behaviours overall.

The findings were presented in two studies at the 12th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, 16-17 March, in Copenhagen, Denmark.
"Patients with congenital heart disease are diagnosed and receive their initial treatment in childhood but this does not mean that they are cured," says the supervisor of both studies, Professor Philip Moons, professor in nursing science at the University of Leuven, Belgium, and guest professor at Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. "They remain vulnerable for developing complications – for instance we know that in patients with congenital heart disease, binge drinking can trigger life-threatening arrhythmias and good dental hygiene helps prevent endocarditis."
For the first study (FPN 34) 1, lifestyle information was collected from 429 adolescents with congenital heart disease aged 14-19 years from the longitudinal study i-DETACH (Information technology Devices and Education programme for Transitioning Adolescents with Congenital Heart disease). Of these, 401 were matched with a control of the same age and gender without congenital heart disease. All participants completed a questionnaire, developed by the research group of Professor Moons, which measures the use of alcohol, cigarettes and illicit drugs, dental care and physical activity. These behaviours are particularly important to the health of patients with congenital heart disease.
Using results from the questionnaire, the researchers calculated risk scores for 'substance use' (binge drinking; smoking; illicit drug use) and 'dental hygiene' (no dental visits; not brushing; not flossing) ranging from 0𔃁. An 'overall health risk score' (range 0𔃅) was calculated using the substance use risk score, dental hygiene risk score, and the absence of physical activity. The 3 risk scores were transformed to a scale ranging from 0 (no risk) to 100 (maximum risk). Scores were compared across different age groups.
In adolescents with congenital heart disease, substance use increased with age (p<0.001). Compared with matched controls, adolescents with congenital heart disease had significantly lower substance use (p<0.001) and health risk (p<0.001) scores, and significantly higher dental hygiene risk scores (p=0.04).
The results reveal that health risk behaviours are prevalent in adolescents with congenital heart disease and they increase with age. They also show that in general, the health behaviour of adolescents with congenital heart disease is better than their peers except for dental hygiene.
Professor Moons says: "The fact that adolescents with congenital heart disease have better health behaviour overall than the general population is understandable given the amount of input they have had from healthcare professionals over their lives. But we need to do more to understand why their dental hygiene is not as good as expected."
For the second study (FPN 158)², the same questionnaire was used to collect lifestyle information from adults aged 16-48 years (average age 24 years) with a type of congenital heart disease called single ventricle physiology. "This is a very complex congenital heart condition and we know that these patients are more at risk for endocarditis and arrhythmias than the larger population of congenital heart disease patients," says Professor Moons. "This means that their health behaviour is even more important."
A cross sectional, case control study was conducted in 59 patients who were matched on age and gender to 172 healthy controls.
In patients with single ventricle physiology, 85% drank alcohol; 26% were binge drinkers; 20% smoked cigarettes; 12% used cannabis over the past year; 20% had not visited the dentist during the last year; 46% were not flossing teeth; and 39% were not physically active.
Compared to healthy controls, patients with single ventricle physiology had better health behaviours overall. But patients exercised less and their dental hygiene practices (mainly flossing) was poorer.
The only statistically significant differences between patients and controls were for binge drinking and physical activity. A significantly lower proportion of binge drinking was found in patients compared to controls (24% vs 41%). And patients exercised less than controls (61% vs 76%).
"Patients with complex conditions can have physical restrictions so the fact that they are less physically active is perhaps not surprising," says Professor Moons. "But the reasons behind the poorer dental hygiene practices of patients in both studies need to be investigated further."
In the past, efforts to prevent endocarditis in patients with congenital heart disease focused on taking antibiotics one hour before a dental procedure. This prevented bacteria released into the blood from damaged gums travelling to the heart and causing an infection (endocarditis).
But researchers have since discovered that daily dental hygiene is more important for preventing endocarditis than antibiotics before a procedure. Professor Moons says: "This was a change in the American Heart Association 2007 guidelines but not all physicians have switched to that new paradigm. And of course if you switch to that paradigm you also need to educate patients in a systematic way, but a lot of centres are not doing that yet."
He adds: "Systematic structured patient education on the importance of dental hygiene is critical for preventing endocarditis in patients with congenital heart disease."

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Evaluation of low-level laser therapy in patients with acute and chronic temporomandibular disorders

Lasers in Medical Science

DOI: 10.1007/s10103-012-1065-8

Abstract


The purpose of this study was to address the following question: among patients with acute or chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD), does low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduce pain intensity and improve maximal mouth opening? The sample comprised myogenic TMD patients (according Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD). Inclusion criteria were: male/female, no age limit, orofacial pain, tender points, limited jaw movements and chewing difficulties. Patients with other TMD subtypes or associated musculoskeletal/rheumatologic disease, missing incisors teeth, LLLT contra-indication, and previous TMD treatment were excluded. According to disease duration, patients were allocated into two groups, acute (<6 months) and chronic TMD (≥6 months). For each patient, 12 LLLT sessions were performed (gallium–aluminum–arsenide; λ = 830 nm, P = 40 mW, CW, ED = 8 J/cm2). Pain intensity was recorded using a 10-cm visual analog scale and maximal mouth opening using a digital ruler (both recorded before/after LLLT). The investigators were previously calibrated and blinded to the groups (double-blind study) and level of significance was 5% (p < 0.05). Fifty-eight patients met all criteria, 32 (acute TMD), and 26 (chronic TMD). Both groups had a significant pain intensity reduction and maximal mouth opening improvement after LLLT (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.001). Between the groups, acute TMD patient had a more significant pain intensity reduction (Mann–Whitney test, p = 0.002) and a more significant maximal mouth opening improvement (Mann–Whitney test, p  = 0.011). Low-level laser therapy can be considered as an alternative physical modality or supplementary approach for management of acute and chronic myogenic temporomandibular disorder; however, patients with acute disease are likely to have a better outcome.

Monday, March 19, 2012

So what was new at the Chicago Mid Winter Meeting?


 It was that time of year and as always I was looking forward to attending the Chicago Mid Winter meeting where many new products for dentistry are introduced. This year there was not a lot of new technology present.  Still there were some items that look promising along with some products I was able to view that are not quite ready. Unfortunately I cannot comment about those products but will let you know when they come available.
The most exciting products I saw at the meeting revolved around dentures. Yes Dentures! Not much has changed in dentures in many years but two companies Avadent and Dentca are changing the way dentures are fabricated. Through the use of CAD/CAM technology impressions are taken and the denture is then fabricated and can be delivered at the next visit. In just two appointments you go from impression to insertion of the denture.
AvaDent (www.avadent.com) takes the impression and digitizes the entire process for fabricating the denture. The interesting part of AvaDent process is the denture base is milled from a special acrylic base that is stronger and more stain resistance then a conventional denture. Should a denture be lost or broken a brand new denture can be milled form the file. Dentica (www.dentca.com) takes a different approach to the two appointment dentures the denture base is printed using stereolithagraphy.  So both of these approaches save valuable chair time and give you a better ROI on fabricating dentures for your patients.
Aribex Nomad (www.aribex.com) the handheld x-ray unit has added a rectangular collimator adapter to the unit. I love using the Nomad in my practice and by adding the rectangular collimator I can further reduce radiation exposure to my patients. We should all be following the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principles and this collimator reduces the 6cm patient dose area by 58%.
Tablet computers controlling dental technology have now become available in the U.S. I had previously seen the Bien Air (www.bienair.com) iChiropro  micromotor controlled by the iPad at the International Dental Show.
The interaction between the practitioner and their iChiropro is unprecedented and extremely user-friendly. In terms of its functionality, the application allows multiple users to customize and store their own sequences. The iChiropro is the only device, which allows users to save, export and print all operation parameters whilst documenting these with the patient data and the implants used. It includes a database featuring the main brands of implant on the market as well as their predefined settings, making it a quick and high-performance tool.
Millennium Dental Technologies (www.lanap.com) now controls their Peirolase Nd:Yag laser with an Andriod Tablet. The tablet is the control screen for the laser allowing more control and the ability to be upgraded.
Liptak Dental (www.liptakdental.com/) has introduced DDS Rescue. This is a specialized computer whose sole purpose is to backup and protect your most valuable asset the office data. The device automatically backs up your data up to 30 times a day onsite as well as to the cloud. In the event of a disaster these remote copies can be booted from the web so you can continue to operate until the problems are resolved.
Crosstex (www.crosstex.com) has introduced the iBarrier for the iPad. With the increased use of iPads in the dental office asepsis is necessary. Tablets are a valuable tool in the dental office for clinical review, case management and patient communication. Their frequently touched surface, however, presents a new risk for cross-contamination caused by airborne aerosols, splash and spatter.
Store-A-Tooth (www.store-a-tooth.com) is a service that provides you the opportunity to store the stem cells inside of teeth that come out. Eligible teeth include baby teeth, wisdom teeth, and other healthy teeth that need to be surgically extracted during the normal course of dental care. Currently there is no medical use for stem cells but we don’t know if they maybe able to treat diseases in the future.
PerioSciences (www.periosciences.com) presented its AO ProVantage family of products, which contain the novel combination of antioxidants Phloretin and Ferulic.  Phloretin and Ferulic have been shown in university based studies to neutralize free radicals which lead to oxidative stress commonly caused by dental materials, alcohol, nicotine, and the hydrogen peroxide used in teeth whitening products. Case studies reveal reduced inflammation and bleeding as well as accelerated wound healing in soft oral tissue.
Patterson Dental had a few new products. RevenueWell is an online system that uses information from the office’s existing practice management software (e.g. Eaglesoft, Dentrix) to automatically communicate with patients, let them access their accounts online and help practices send out highly targeted, effective marketing campaigns to the patient base. 
The AG Neovo, is a computer monitor for those offices that are still not using digital radiography. In less than a second and with a “flip of a switch” this monitor has the ability to change from a standard monitor to an X-ray viewer, allowing dental professionals to see everything needed with just one monitor.  
The third product is an update to Caesy Cloud, its online patient education portal that gives users access to CAESY Patient Education multimedia presentations via the Cloud. CAESY Cloud 1.2 now gives practices the ability to embed CAESY presentations within their website(s), and also offers a number of new and updated presentations to increase case acceptance and enhance practice offerings.
Carestream  (formerly Kodak) Dental introduced five of the newest additions to its intraoral imaging system, intraoral camera and software suites.
The compact CS 7600 digital intraoral radiography system reinvents imaging plate technology by improving usability, productivity and security. This cost- effective system’s patented intelligent workflow technology prevents plate mix-up and reduces operation time. The CS 7600 is fully automated and as easy to use as film – with all the benefits of digital imaging. This unit raises the bar for all phosphor plate scanners.

The CS 1600 is a multi-use intraoral camera with caries detection technology and an intra oral camera. With the widest focus range on the market (1mm to infinity), this camera features the same unique liquid-lens autofocus technology as Carestream Dental’s 1500 Intraoral Camera as well as a sophisticated 18-LED illumination system and an optional polarizer filter to reduce glare.

An additional new intraoral camera, the CS 1200, is easy to use and provides practitioners with an affordable entry point into digital imaging. The CS 1200 captures crisp, clear images. The camera’s wide focus range captures a variety of images including macro, single teeth, arches and smiles, and it has the ability to store up to 300 images within the camera itself.

Logicon Caries DetectorTM Software, the only FDA-approved caries detection software, is now available in an automatic version. This software serves as a computer-aided detection tool that is clinically proven to help dentists find more interproximal caries on intraoral radiographs. This new version of Logicon Software improves practice efficiency with the ability to automatically run the detection algorithm on all applicable tooth surfaces within a radiograph and immediately display the results, with a single click.

Carestream Dental’s RVG 6500 System, the RVG Mobile application enables dentists to review images chairside on an iPad, improving patient communication and case acceptance. RVG Mobile also provides remote access to dental imaging software files, so stored images can be easily transferred to practice computers for diagnosis and archiving. This solution cuts practice equipment costs since extra monitors are no longer needed.
So those were some of the new products shown at the Chicago Midwinter Meeting. We will see what new products are coming later in the year.  

Saturday, March 17, 2012

ORAL HEALTH AND OVERALL HEALTH



Gum disease is much more common than you might think, and it can lead to major health problems like diabetes and heart disease.



 Oral Health vs. Overall Health by 1Dental

Infographic: Oral Health vs. Overall Health by 1Dental.com

Friday, March 16, 2012

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Hong Kong dentist to help check pharaoh's cavity



HONG KONG (Reuters) - A Hong Kong dentist is wielding forceps to help reach for answers inside the last surviving example of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Great Pyramid of Giza.
Dentist Ng Tze-chuen poses inside his dental clinic in Hong Kong February 24, 2012. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

Pulling teeth by day and devising inventions by night, Ng Tze-chuen, 59, said he organized a team working with Egypt's former antiquities minister Zahi Hawass to unlock the mystery surrounding the doors blocking two narrow shafts in the pyramid, which is the tomb of the Pharaoh Cheops, also known as Khufu.
"The Chinese have more experience with chopsticks. And a dentist has more experience in gripping with forceps," said Ng.
Read the rest by clicking here.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Gum Healing Promoted Around Exposed Roots

Receding gums often result in tooth sensitivity and can lead to decay of the root and persistent inflammation of the gum. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Head & Face Medicine demonstrates that a novel method using bovine collagen is able to enhance gum healing. This resulted in thicker margins around the tooth and, in over half the cases, complete coverage of exposed roots.

Researchers across Germany and Switzerland led by Dr Shahram Ghanaati and the dentist Dr Markus Schlee investigated the possibility of using collagen, extracted from bovine pericardium, to form a support for mending receding gums and exposed roots. The collagen was extracted by a process involving osmotic, oxidative and alkaline treatment. This ensured that the cell walls were broken down, proteins and fats dissolved, and that bacteria, viruses and other pathogens were inactivated and removed.

The study followed 14 otherwise healthy patients with over 60 'recessions' between them. Their damaged teeth were cleaned before surgery and the collagen implants held in place with loops of surgical thread around the affected tooth. Two weeks later the sutures were removed. None of the patients needed antibiotics.

The patients were re-examined after six months to see how well they had recovered. Dr Schlee described the results, "In all cases the healed-over implant improved the look and severity of the recession, and, in over half of all treatments, resulted in total coverage of the exposed root. We would not have expected any of these patients to get better without surgery."

The collagen seems to be able to act as a scaffold for the body's own cells to repair the damage leading to results on a level comparable to that of connective tissue grafts. Bovine collagen is a possible solution for patients with little available donor tissue or for whom multiple surgeries are not an option.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Zhermack Introduces the New Dune EcoTech Micro-Sandblasting System


River Edge, NJ (March 1, 2012) – Zhermack Inc., a company that specializes in the production of materials and equipment for dental practices and dental laboratories, recently introduced its new Dune EcoTech Micro-Sandblasting System. The EcoTech is the perfect balance of efficiency and durable state-of-the-art design, making the EcoTech the ideal choice for maximum sandblasting precision.
The EcoTech maintains minimum sand consumption and reduces oxide and microsphere supply costs due to its unique sand recirculation system, calibrated dosing and blasting nozzles, and instant flow shut-off valves. Extreme dust suction is achieved through a double connection that is equally effective from either side of the machine, ensuring maximum suction performance and operator safety.
The flow shut-off valves and calibrated nozzles immediately interrupt sand flow when the unit pedal is released, allowing for controlled sand dosage and a dramatic reduction in sand consumption. The recirculating function reprocesses the abrasive materials for roughening procedures and lining removals, meaning the majority of the remaining sand is recycled and reused, resulting in minimum waste. Each EcoTech is equipped with a built-in reserve air tank.
The large-capacity plastic chamber (over 25 liters) of the EcoTech unit is durable and elegantly designed. The ergonomic design of the handles and nozzles makes sandblasting with the EcoTech system user-friendly, while powerful, adjustable LED lighting improves visibility while blasting. The LED lighting feature has an interchangeable protective film that protects the light
source from accidental abrasion during blasting and ensures longevity of the bulbs. In addition, the protective film is also applied to the EcoTech’s viewing hatch, which helps maintain an excellent exterior condition and superior user visibility throughout the lifespan of the unit.
“The innovative EcoTech system was created out of an effort to offer optimum sandblasting quality, while at the same time maintain a reduction in overall sand consumption,” remarked Nick Holm, Sales & Marketing Manager for Zhermack, Inc. “The result is the most efficient and durable sandblaster available; the ideal solution for surface cleaning, polishing, and brightening.”
Modular, large-size tanks (1000cc) with level indicator and vent valves substantially reduce filling times and allow air pressure to be released quickly and safely. The EcoTech is available in either a two- or three-tank design, and each unit carries a two-year warranty.
For more information about the Dune EcoTech Micro-Sandblasting System, please call 1-877- 819-6206 or visit www.zhermackusa.com.

Monday, March 12, 2012

Stem cell research reveals key role for bad breath

Japanese researchers find compound responsible for halitosis may help in development of valuable treatments
The compound responsible for bad breath may help speed the development of stem cells from dental pulp into valuable treatments for patients, according to Japanese researchers.
Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), the noxious mix that smells of rotten eggs and is a major cause of halitosis, appears to help transform the cells into liver cells, said a team from Nippon Dental University, Tokyo. It collected stem cells from the pulp – the central part of the tooth made up of connective tissue and cells – from patients undergoing routine extractions before separating them into a group incubated in an H2S chamber and a control group.
They were analysed after three, six and nine days, to see whether they changed into liver cells and tested for their effectiveness, including the ability to store glycogen, which is converted to glucose when the body needs energy, and collect urea, the by-product of protein metabolism, which is transferred by the kidneys from blood to urine.
The researchers, whose findings are published in the Journal of Breath Research, published by the Institute of Physics, said their work suggested liver cells could be produced in high numbers to a high quality. Lead author Ken Yaegaki said: "High purity means there are less 'wrong cells' that are being differentiated to other tissues, or remaining as stem cells … These facts suggest that patients undergoing transplantation with the hepatic cells may have almost no possibility of developing teratomas (malignant tumours) or cancers.
"Until now, nobody has produced the protocol to regenerate such a huge number of hepatic cells for human transplantation. Compared to the traditional method or suing fetal bovine serum to produce the cells, our method is productive and, most importantly, safe."
Anthony Hollander, head of cellular and molecular medicine at Bristol University, said: "This is interesting work in a new direction but there's a long way to go to see if it is usable therapeutically."
The real test of a liver cell was whether it could metabolise sp

Saturday, March 10, 2012

The effects of mouthguards on the athletic ability of professional golfers

Pae, A., Yoo, R.-K., Noh, K., Paek, J. and Kwon, K.-R. (2012), The effects of mouthguards on the athletic ability of professional golfers. Dental Traumatology. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-9657.2012.01123.x

Abstract –  The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of stabilization splints and mouthguards on the athletic ability of professional golfers. For this study, eight professional golfers with a mean age of 20.5 were selected. These participants performed four trials of 10 driver swings and 10 putts with or without a stabilization splint (control group) or mouthguard. For the 4th trial, the splints were adjusted using a simple blind test so that the participants were unaware of the unilateral molar contact. The drive distance, club head speed, initial ball speed, and putting accuracy were compared and analyzed before and after the application of equal bilateral molar occlusion. When the bilateral molar occlusion was applied using a mouthguard or stabilization splint, the club head speed and driving distance in the presence of the oral appliances were significantly increased compared with those without the presence of either appliance (P < 0.05). Alternatively, the initial ball speed and putting accuracy in the presence of these appliances were increased compared with those without the presence of an appliance; however, this effect was not statistically significant. When the mouthguards or stabilization splints were adjusted to result in unilateral molar occlusion, the club head speed and driving distance in the presence of the appliances were significantly decreased compared with those that were obtained without these appliances (P < 0.05). The initial ball speed and the putting accuracy were not affected by the use of the appliances. No difference was observed in the effectiveness of the stabilization splint and mouthguard when bilateral molar occlusion was performed. The occlusion stability that results from stabilization splints and mouthguards is thought to increase the club head speed and driving distance in professional golf players.

Friday, March 09, 2012

Composi-Tight 3D Sectional Matrix System from Garrison Dental Solutions has been named the 2012 Top Sectional Matrix by The Dental Advisor.


Composi-Tight 3D Best for Class II’s

The Composi-Tight 3D Sectional Matrix System from Garrison Dental Solutions has been named the 2012 Top Sectional Matrix and Preferred Sectional Matrix by The Dental Advisor.

Composi-Tight 3D produces tight anatomically accurate contacts at the height of contour with virtually zero flash.  This is accomplished with three dimensionally contoured Soft Face tips that conform to the surface of the tooth sealing the edges of the matrix band.  Composi-Tight is the only system to employ this technology.  Separation of the teeth by compression of the periodontal ligaments is produced by usage of stainless spring steel reinforced by advanced polymers.  This combination produces a ring that is fully steam autoclavable and retains both its tension and shape for hundreds of uses.

The advanced 3D separator rings are provided with Garrison’s new Slick Bands non-stick sectional matrix bands.  These dead soft, pre-contoured, ultra-thin matrix bands are available in 5 sizes to cover a wide range of cases.  Bonding agent adhesion to the matrix band is virtually eliminated allowing for easy band removal while producing extremely tight contacts.

This award winning system is available directly from Garrison Dental Solutions in the United States by calling 888-437-0032 or on the web at www.garrisondental.com.


Thursday, March 08, 2012

Optimism and humour can help to combat dental fear






IMAGE: Optimism and humor can help to combat dental fear.






Click here for more information.

Scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have investigated the strategies used by people who suffer from dental fear to cope with dental treatment. Some of the most important factors in managing stress during a visit to the dentist include optimism on the part of the patient and an atmosphere of humour in the interaction with the dental staff.
In an international perspective, about 50% of the adult population suffer from some degree of dental fear, making it one of the most common fears. In its most serious form it can cause extreme stress and lead to people avoiding dental care altogether, thus dental fear turned into dental phobia.
Fiver percent have severe dental fear
Despite this, most people, and this include many of the approximate 5% of the population who suffer from severe dental fear, do go to the dentist regularly. In order to increase understanding of dental fear and its causes, scientists from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg have in two unique studies investigated the strategies people with dental fear use to cope with visiting the dentist, including dental treatment.
Five strategies to overcome
In one study, Jenny Bernson and her colleagues asked people suffering from dental fear to complete a questionnaire, and the researchers could identify five principal strategies used to overcome dental fear:
  • Self-efficacy, using one's own internal resources (for example: "I tell myself to be strong enough to stand it, despite my fear")
  • Self-distraction (for example: "I count to myself, sing to myself or try to play mental games with myself to keep my mind off the treatment")
  • Distancing (for example: "I think that the pain sensation feels like something else such as numbness")
  • Prayer (for example: "I pray that the treatment will soon be over")
  • Optimism (for example: "I try to think of the future, about what everything will be like after the treatment").
"The study has shown that patients who adopt an optimistic mindset cope with dental treatment significantly better and they visit the dentist more regularly than patients who spend their time in prayer, despair or catastrophizing", says Jenny Bernson.
Humour most important
The second study was based on interviews with patients suffering from dental fear, and the interviewed patients mentioned humour as one of the most important factors. "Psychological barriers can be broken down by humour, both as a result of the patient and the dentist coming together more as equals, and as a result of humour reducing stress, increasing well-being and creating a pleasant atmosphere", says Jenny Bernson.
The strategies that these two studies have identified will form the basis of a questionnaire that may be possible to use in the future when treating patients suffering from dental fear.
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The article "Adaptive coping strategies among adults with dental fear. Further development of a new version of the Dental Coping Strategy Questionnaire" has been published in the scientific journal Acta Odontologica Scandinavica.

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Patterson Dental Releases CAESY Cloud 1.2

Version 1.2 offers website compatibility and even more presentations via the Cloud

ST. PAUL, Minn. – (February 29, 2012) – Patterson Dental Supply, Inc. announces new updates to CAESY Cloud, its online patient education portal that gives users access to CAESY Patient Education multimedia presentations via the Cloud. CAESY Cloud 1.2 now gives practices the ability to embed CAESY presentations within their website(s), and also offers a number of new and updated presentations to increase case acceptance and enhance practice offerings.
The new ability for subscribers to embed CAESY Cloud presentations within their websites allows professionals to better promote their services and demonstrate their commitment to educating patients with detailed explanations of dental conditions and treatment options. This online tool can be especially helpful for doctors who offer cutting-edge procedures for their patients. For example, dentists who specialize in CEREC restorations may find it beneficial to embed videos in their website to promote their abilities to patients or prospective patients.
In addition to this new capability, three new presentations are now available to help practices keep patients informed: Cleaning Prosthetics, Payment Options and Cone Beam X-rays. Additionally, 39 presentations have been updated to keep CAESY Cloud the most current patient education software in the industry with new dental technology and procedures, matching the high-tech atmosphere of today’s dental practices. Presentations in the sections for Dentures, Implants, and Post-op Instructions have also been refreshed to include the newest technology developments.
Launched in July 2011, CAESY Cloud currently offers more than 280 multimedia presentations, which dental offices can access on PC and Mac desktop computers, Smartphones, and the iPad, iPhone and iPod. CAESY Cloud requires no installation. All that is needed to access CAESY Cloud is an Internet connection—networked connections between participating computers are not required. Dental professionals can simply sign up for the service by visiting www.CAESYCloud.com and gain access to the presentations for immediate use from anywhere. After subscribing, users then visit the website to access the full library of CAESY’s robust patient education presentations. A low monthly subscription fee makes CAESY Cloud available to dental practices with little initial investment.
CAESY Education Systems has been dentistry’s premier developer of leading-edge patient education technology and content since 1993. Patterson Dental Supply, Inc. acquired CAESY in May 2004. The award winning multimedia information on preventive, restorative and esthetic treatment options helps dental practices worldwide educate their patients and grow their practices. The CAESY content is distributed via video and computer networks, DVD players and CAESY Cloud throughout the clinical and reception areas of the dental practice. The family of products includes CAESY Cloud, CAESY DVD, Smile Channel DVD, and CAESY
Enterprise, which includes CAESY, Smile Channel and ShowCase. For more information, visit www.caesy.com

###

Patterson Dental Supply, Inc. is a value-added distributor of a complete range of dental products, equipment and services for dentists, dental laboratories, institutions and other healthcare providers throughout North America. Patterson Dental has the largest direct sales force in the industry, totaling more than 1,400 sales representatives and equipment software specialists serving the United States and Canada.

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on enamel caries prevention

DOI: 10.1007/s10103-012-1056-9

Abstract


The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation on the acid resistance of dental enamel. Forty human enamel samples were divided into four groups. They were manually irradiated with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser device (λ = 2.78 µm, 20 Hz, 20 s), in a scanning mode, with and without water cooling, according to the following parameters: Group 1: 0.25 W, 62.5 J/cm2, no water cooling; group 2: 0.25 W, 62.5 J/cm2, 5.0 ml/min; group 3: 0.5 W, 125 J/cm2, no water cooling; group 4: 0.5 W, 125 J/cm2, 5.0 ml/min. No airflow was used. Afterwards, the samples were submitted to an acid challenge and assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 µm) from the outer enamel surface. Average values were obtained for both irradiated and control areas in each sample and they were compared to obtain a percentage of microhardness increase. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Fisher’s exact test (α = 5%). The percentage of microhardness increase observed in group 1 (+23.58%) was similar to group 3 (+19.12%), but higher than groups 2 (+3.61%) and 4 (10.9%) (p < 0.05). The comparison of the depths showed that the Er,Cr:YSGG laser acted in the superficial layers of the dental enamel. The findings of the present study suggest that the energy densities of 62.5 and 125 J/cm2 were capable of increasing the acid resistance of human enamel. The presence of water during irradiation makes it difficult to obtain an enamel surface more resistant to acids.

Monday, March 05, 2012

Henry Schein launches new version of Dentrix Mobile enhanced for the Apple iPad



If you are an Apple iPad user and want to use it as part of your Dentrix practice management, you may be interested to know that Henry Schein just launched of a new version of Dentrix® Mobile that is enhanced for the iPad’s large screen and resolution. Dentrix Mobile is a remote access tool that allows dentists and office staff to view their appointment schedules, prescriptions, medical alerts and patient information from their smartphones and tablet devices.  The updated version allows dentists to take advantage of the iPad’s larger screens to see an enhanced view of their Dentrix practice and patient information whenever they are out of the office. It also lets users add notes to the appointment book or confirm appointments -- anytime, anywhere.
                “Many of our Dentrix users own Apple iPads and understand how effective tablets can be to remotely access their Dentrix data,” said Kevin Bunker, President, Henry Schein Practice Solutions. “With our new version of Dentrix Mobile, dentists who use Apple iPad or Motorola Xoom tablets can now take advantage of the larger screens to see enhanced Dentrix graphics and more practice information.”
The new notes feature will help iPad and Xoom users keep track of requests and after hours patient follow-up while out of the office. “Since notes can be added for a specific patient or day in the appointment book, dentists who take after-hour calls can take notes and have them automatically updated to Dentrix and able to see them the next time they open the patient’s appointment,” said Adam McDaniel, eServices product manager for Henry Schein Practice Solutions.
Dentrix Users who also own Dentrix eCentral -- a bundle of electronic services that manage patient communication and insurance billing -- can now use their iPad or Xoom to confirm appointments outside of the office with the new version of Dentrix Mobile. “The confirmation is immediately updated in Dentrix so that the front desk team, hygienist or contracted workers can confirm appointments outside of normal business hours or without going into the office,” Mr. McDaniel said. “Dentrix eCentral users can also mark a patient’s insurance status as eligible or initiate an eligibility verification update from the patient’s insurance carrier without being in the office,” he added.
Dentrix Mobile offers security features to ensure practice employees have authorized access and patient data security is safe. Dentrix Mobile manages multiple accounts, giving dentists the ability to easily add or remove users as necessary. “Having multiple accounts eliminate the need for the entire staff to learn new login credentials when an employee leaves. Also, dentists can see which team members have logged in to Mobile and when,” McDaniel added.
Dentrix Mobile runs on the latest smartphones and mobile devices, including BlackBerry®, iPhone™, iPad™, Palm Pre™, Motorola Xoom™ and Android™.  The newest upgraded version of Dentrix Mobile is free to customers with the latest version of Dentrix and a Customer Service Plan.
If you are an Apple iPad user and want to use it as part of your Dentrix practice management, you may be interested to know that Henry Schein just launched of a new version of Dentrix® Mobile that is enhanced for the iPad’s large screen and resolution. Dentrix Mobile is a remote access tool that allows dentists and office staff to view their appointment schedules, prescriptions, medical alerts and patient information from their smartphones and tablet devices.  The updated version allows dentists to take advantage of the iPad’s larger screens to see an enhanced view of their Dentrix practice and patient information whenever they are out of the office. It also lets users add notes to the appointment book or confirm appointments -- anytime, anywhere.
                “Many of our Dentrix users own Apple iPads and understand how effective tablets can be to remotely access their Dentrix data,” said Kevin Bunker, President, Henry Schein Practice Solutions. “With our new version of Dentrix Mobile, dentists who use Apple iPad or Motorola Xoom tablets can now take advantage of the larger screens to see enhanced Dentrix graphics and more practice information.”
The new notes feature will help iPad and Xoom users keep track of requests and after hours patient follow-up while out of the office. “Since notes can be added for a specific patient or day in the appointment book, dentists who take after-hour calls can take notes and have them automatically updated to Dentrix and able to see them the next time they open the patient’s appointment,” said Adam McDaniel, eServices product manager for Henry Schein Practice Solutions.
Dentrix Users who also own Dentrix eCentral -- a bundle of electronic services that manage patient communication and insurance billing -- can now use their iPad or Xoom to confirm appointments outside of the office with the new version of Dentrix Mobile. “The confirmation is immediately updated in Dentrix so that the front desk team, hygienist or contracted workers can confirm appointments outside of normal business hours or without going into the office,” Mr. McDaniel said. “Dentrix eCentral users can also mark a patient’s insurance status as eligible or initiate an eligibility verification update from the patient’s insurance carrier without being in the office,” he added.
Dentrix Mobile offers security features to ensure practice employees have authorized access and patient data security is safe. Dentrix Mobile manages multiple accounts, giving dentists the ability to easily add or remove users as necessary. “Having multiple accounts eliminate the need for the entire staff to learn new login credentials when an employee leaves. Also, dentists can see which team members have logged in to Mobile and when,” McDaniel added.
Dentrix Mobile runs on the latest smartphones and mobile devices, including BlackBerry®, iPhone™, iPad™, Palm Pre™, Motorola Xoom™ and Android™.  The newest upgraded version of Dentrix Mobile is free to customers with the latest version of Dentrix and a Customer Service Plan.

If you are an Apple iPad user and want to use it as part of your Dentrix practice management, you may be interested to know that Henry Schein just launched of a new version of Dentrix® Mobile that is enhanced for the iPad’s large screen and resolution. Dentrix Mobile is a remote access tool that allows dentists and office staff to view their appointment schedules, prescriptions, medical alerts and patient information from their smartphones and tablet devices.  The updated version allows dentists to take advantage of the iPad’s larger screens to see an enhanced view of their Dentrix practice and patient information whenever they are out of the office. It also lets users add notes to the appointment book or confirm appointments -- anytime, anywhere.
                “Many of our Dentrix users own Apple iPads and understand how effective tablets can be to remotely access their Dentrix data,” said Kevin Bunker, President, Henry Schein Practice Solutions. “With our new version of Dentrix Mobile, dentists who use Apple iPad or Motorola Xoom tablets can now take advantage of the larger screens to see enhanced Dentrix graphics and more practice information.”
The new notes feature will help iPad and Xoom users keep track of requests and after hours patient follow-up while out of the office. “Since notes can be added for a specific patient or day in the appointment book, dentists who take after-hour calls can take notes and have them automatically updated to Dentrix and able to see them the next time they open the patient’s appointment,” said Adam McDaniel, eServices product manager for Henry Schein Practice Solutions.
Dentrix Users who also own Dentrix eCentral -- a bundle of electronic services that manage patient communication and insurance billing -- can now use their iPad or Xoom to confirm appointments outside of the office with the new version of Dentrix Mobile. “The confirmation is immediately updated in Dentrix so that the front desk team, hygienist or contracted workers can confirm appointments outside of normal business hours or without going into the office,” Mr. McDaniel said. “Dentrix eCentral users can also mark a patient’s insurance status as eligible or initiate an eligibility verification update from the patient’s insurance carrier without being in the office,” he added.
Dentrix Mobile offers security features to ensure practice employees have authorized access and patient data security is safe. Dentrix Mobile manages multiple accounts, giving dentists the ability to easily add or remove users as necessary. “Having multiple accounts eliminate the need for the entire staff to learn new login credentials when an employee leaves. Also, dentists can see which team members have logged in to Mobile and when,” McDaniel added.
Dentrix Mobile runs on the latest smartphones and mobile devices, including BlackBerry®, iPhone™, iPad™, Palm Pre™, Motorola Xoom™ and Android™.  The newest upgraded version of Dentrix Mobile is free to customers with the latest version of Dentrix and a Customer Service Plan.