Thursday, December 31, 2015

Scientists grow new implantable teeth for mice

A team of scientists in Japan is working on growing multiple, fully-functional teeth and implanting them in mice.  read more

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Barriers faced by expanded practice dental hygienists in Oregon.

J Dent Hyg. 2015 Apr;89(2):91-100.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Oregon allows dental hygienists to provide services without the supervision of a dentist if they hold an expanded practice permit (EPP). This study surveyed practicing and non-practicing EPP holders with the purpose of assessing perceived barriers to practicing independently and better educating students to begin independent practice upon graduation.

METHODS:

A survey was developed, approved by the institutional review board and pilot tested with current Expanded Practice Dental Hygienists (EPDHs). A list of EPDHs was obtained from the Oregon State Dental Board, and 181 surveys were mailed in November 2011.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 39% (n=71). Data from this study indicate a large number of new EPP holders, with 62% (n=41) holding their permit for 3 years or less, but only 41% (n=29) of respondents are actually providing care in a setting requiring an EPP. Responding practicing EPDHs reported barriers including: challenges with insurance reimbursement, lack of knowledge/acceptance, equipment cost/maintenance, difficulty obtaining a collaborative agreement/cooperating facility, advertising and inability to make a living wage. Responding non-practicing EPDHs reported barriers including: currently working in another setting, lack of business knowledge, time, start-up cost, inability to make a living wage, lack of opportunity, reimbursement difficulties and lack of experience.

CONCLUSION:

Perceived barriers to practicing independently differ between those practicing utilizing their EPP and those not practicing. Ways to eliminate barriers for both practicing and non-practicing EPDHs should be explored. There is potential to reduce the barriers to independent practice through curricular changes, public health partnerships among EPDHs, and new health care systems that specifically address barriers found through this study.

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Dental Fear and Delayed Dental Care in Appalachia-West Virginia.

J Dent Hyg. 2015 Aug;89(4):274-81.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The people of Appalachia-West Virginia are culturally unique and are known to have oral health disparities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental fear in relation to delayed dental care as a factor influencing oral health behaviors within this culture.

METHODS:

A cross sectional study design was used. Participants were urgent care patients in a university dental clinic. The sample included 140 adults over age 18 years. The Dental Fear Survey was used to determine dental fear level. Self-report of delayed dental care was provided by the participants. The Dental Fear Survey was dichotomized at score 33, with higher scores indicating dental fear.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of dental fear was 47.1% (n=66). There was a significant association of dental fear and dental delay. The unadjusted odds ratio was 2.87 (95% CI: 1.17, 7.04; p=0.021). The adjusted odds ratio was 3.83 (95%CI: 1.14, 12.82; p=0.030), controlling for tobacco use, perceived oral health status, pain, and last dental visit. A difference in dental delay between men and women was not present in this sample. The only significant variable in delayed dental care was dental fear.

CONCLUSION:

In Appalachia-West Virginia, there remains a high level of dental fear, despite advances in dental care, techniques, and procedures.

Monday, December 28, 2015

The effect of interincisal opening, cavity location and operator experience on the energy delivered by a light-curing unit to a simulated dental restoration.

Prim Dent J. 2014 May;3(2):26-31.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Curing of resin-based composites depends on the delivery of adequate total energy, which may be operator dependent. Aim To determine the effect of interincisal opening, cavity location and operator experience on the total energy delivered to simulated cavity preparation sites.

DESIGN:

Three cohorts were included: junior dental nurses, senior dental nurses and qualified dentists (N=5, each cohort). Each operator (participant) followed the same procedure and light-cured two simulated restorations in a MARC patient simulator using a Demi light-curing unit for 20 seconds in each of the following situations: left upper second molar (UL7), interincisal opening at both 25 mm and 45 mm; upper central incisor (UR1), interincisal opening at 45mm. The light energy delivered by each operator in each situation was recorded. Five readings for each operator were taken at each interincisal distance. Statistical comparisons of delivered energy (J/cm2) between interincisal openings, location and groups in the total energy delivered were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test: alpha = 0.05.

RESULTS:

Less total energy was delivered to the posterior cavity at 25mm (12.0 +/- 5.3 J/cm2) than at 45mm (16.9 +/- 5.6 J/cm2) by all operators (P < 0.05). At 45 mm, less total energy was delivered to the posterior cavity compared to the anterior cavity (25.1 +/- 7.4 J/cm2; P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between junior nurses and qualified dentists (P > 0.05) but there was a significant difference in the total energy delivered between senior nurses (20.1 +/- 7.8 J/cm2) and junior nurses (17.5 +/- 7.6 J/cm2) and between senior nurses and qualified dentists (16.6 +/- 8.7 J/cm2) (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Interincisal mouth opening, location of the cavity and operator experience affected the total energy delivered to cavities in a simulated clinical environment.

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

An audit of antimicrobial prescribing in an acute dental care department.

Prim Dent J. 2014 Nov;3(4):24-9. doi: 10.1308/205016814813877270.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Antimicrobial resistance is a growing problem that is likely to have a major negative impact on healthcare in the future. Dentists have a key role in ensuring that antimicrobials are prescribed correctly to reduce the emergence of resistant strains.

OBJECTIVE:

To audit how appropriately antimicrobials were prescribed in the oral surgery acute dental department of Guy's Hospital in London, when compared to the standards set within the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) and Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness guidelines on antimicrobial prescribing in dentistry.

TARGET:

100% compliance.

METHOD:

A prospective audit consisting of two cycles (each including 60 patients) was carried out. Between each cycle, there was a two-month intervention period, which included extensive training and education of staff and students.

RESULTS:

Cycle 1 showed that only 30% of prescriptions were appropriate and only 62% of practitioners were recording a diagnosis. After two months of intervention, cycle 2 was carried out; this showed a significant improvement, with 80% of prescriptions being appropriate and 100% of practitioners recording a diagnosis. The majority of inappropriate prescriptions in both cycles were for acute pulpitis without evidence of systemic involvement.

CONCLUSION:

This audit has shown that clinical practice for antimicrobial prescribing did not follow the published guidelines. Following targeted interventions, a substantial improvement was made in the prescribing pattern. The target of 100% has not been reached, necessitating further intervention.

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

DentalEZ® Integrated Solutions Offers Virtual Operatory Designer



Online Operatory Designer Allows Dental Professionals to
Visualize and Design the Ideal Operatory


Malvern, PA (December 15, 2015) – DentalEZ® Integrated Solutions, a supplier of integrated products and services for dental health professionals worldwide, is pleased to offer dental professionals an online Operatory Designer. The Operatory Designer is an online resource that allows users to visualize and personally configure operatories to perfectly match workspace requirements and style preferences.

Dental professionals can log on to operatory.dentalez.com and view numerous color and style configurations for each operatory component. The Operatory Designer resource allows the dental professional to customize the entire dental operatory:

  • Chairs and Stools–available choices include numerous DentalEZ chair and stool selections and upholstery types with over 40 color possibilities. Dental professionals can choose between Ultraleather, Ultraleather Fusion, Naugahyde®, and NaugaSoft colors.

  • Cabinet Countertops–solid surface countertop designs include twelve different color patterns such as Baja Melange, Crystal Mint, and Bedrock.

  • Cabinet Laminates–options include a wide assortment of hues to coordinate with your countertops and office palette. 

  • Floor and Walls–for the backdrop and floor of the operatory, dental professionals can choose from six wall, and eleven wood or tile floor shades that set the stage for a pleasant operatory experience.

Users of the Operatory Designer begin with a blank operatory canvas and have the option to personalize each and every operatory component. Moreover, operatory designs can be saved, downloaded, printed, or emailed to share with colleagues or a personal DentalEZ territory sales member to make the virtual operatory a reality.

“We wanted to take the apprehension and guesswork out of operatory design and bring back the excitement of it for the dental professional,” remarked Aggie Pennington, Senior Equipment Product Manager for DentalEZ.  “Planning the design and colors for the operatory can truly be a hit or miss situation and instead of simply imagining what it will look like, we wanted to provide a precise image of the endless possibilities that DentalEZ offers for the ideal operatory. It’s a fun yet very resourceful tool.” 

To try the new Operatory Designer, please visit operatory.dentalez.com. 

About DentalEZ®

DentalEZ® is committed to advancing the practice of dentistry through fully integrated products and services. Encompassing five distinct product categories—StarDental®, DentalEZ®, RAMVAC®, NevinLabs, and Columbia Dentoform®—DentalEZ® manufactures everything in the operatory, from handpieces to chairs to vacuum systems to dental simulation models, creating a complete line of products to elevate the health, comfort, and efficiency of the dental operatory. For more information, please visit www.dentalez.com.

# # #

Monday, December 21, 2015

Prize Offered for Winning Abstract

The Organization for Safety, Asepsis and Prevention (OSAP), the advocate for The Safest Dental Visit™, is seeking abstracts for their Annual Infection Control Conference, June 2-4, 2016, in San Diego, CA. The abstracts will be reviewed by a prestigious panel of experts according to International Association for Dental Research (IADR) review criteria with the objective to advance infection control and patient safety research and a clinical practice agenda across international borders. The abstract judged best overall will be awarded the James A. Cottone Award for Excellence in Investigative Research, which includes a cash award of $500 and a recognition plaque. Accepted papers will be presented in poster format. OSAP may invite a limited number of researchers to present their findings orally.

Abstracts may be submitted in any of the following categories: Infection Prevention and Control, Occupational Safety and Health, Antibiotic Resistance, Environmental Science, or Other (analysis of policy development and implementation, new analysis of existing research, meta-analysis or synthesis from existing studies or behavioral studies of utilization or adoption of practices by dental personnel.)

To be considered for presentation, abstracts must meet IADR criteria for scientific merit and the research presented must not have been previously published as a note or full-length article in a journal. Abstracts published or presented at another scientific meeting during the previous year may be submitted for poster presentation, but will not be eligible to compete for the Cottone award. At least one of the authors of the abstract must be a current member of OSAP;

Abstracts will be evaluated utilizing a 100-point scale, with a minimally acceptable level of 65 points. The criteria considered by the expert reviewers include scientific rigor, originality, clinical relevance, and contribution to the scientific literature.

Non-student applicants with accepted abstracts will be granted a $100 discount on conference registration. If the applicants have previously registered at the early-bird rate, this discount will be refunded. Full-time students with accepted abstracts will receive a special student-abstract rate of $75.

All submissions must be received at the OSAP Central Office no later than 11:59 pm EST on Friday, March 18, 2016. Applicants will be notified by email of acceptance by Friday, April 1, 2016. Full details, including submission format, presentation format, and acceptance procedure, are available on the OSAP website at: www.osap.org/?page=2016Abstracts.

The OSAP Annual Conference is the premier infection control education and networking event in the dental industry. Nationally and internationally known experts discuss current and emerging issues relating to infection prevention and safety in oral healthcare settings, and provide attendees with essential resources, valuable tools, and new approaches for better protecting patients and staff. Visit http://www.osap.org/?page=2016AnnualConference for more details.

Celebrating over 30 years of service to the worldwide dental community, OSAP is a growing community of clinicians, educators, students, policy-makers, and industry representatives who advocate for safe and infection-free delivery of oral healthcare. OSAP focuses on strategies to improve compliance with safe practices and on building a strong network of recognized infection control experts. OSAP offers an extensive online collection of resources, publications, FAQs, checklists and toolkits to help dental professionals ensure that every visit is The Safest Dental Visit™ for patients and the dental team.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Can shielded brackets reduce mucosa alteration and increase comfort perception in orthodontic patients in the first 3 days of treatment? A single-blind randomized controlled trial

 

Introduction

Orthodontic patients can experience pain and discomfort on the oral mucosa from trauma caused by friction with the brackets and the wires. In this split-mouth design, single-blind randomized controlled trial, we aimed to investigate whether brackets with a self-snapping customized plastic shield would induce less mucosa alteration and discomfort than those without the shield.

Methods

The overall sample comprised 42 patients (22 female, 20 male) from a government-funded orthodontic practice, with a mean age of 16.7 years. Eligibility criteria included, among others, no history of mouth ulcers or systemic diseases. Customized shields for the maxillary and mandibular brackets were fabricated and inserted on one side of the mouth. The null hypothesis was that bracket shielding would have no advantage. The primary outcomes were mucosal and discomfort assessments. As the secondary outcome, the numbers of spontaneous detachments of the shields were reported. Treatment allocation was mainly implemented using a random number table for selection of the intervention side. Only the raters in charge of assessing the oral mucosa were blinded to the side of the mouth where the shields had been placed. The mucosa was assessed by 3 calibrated raters at the following time points: immediately before bracket placement (baseline assessment, T0), 3 days after delivering the shields (direct assessment of intervention, T1), and 4 days after removal of the shields (indirect assessment of intervention, T2). The raters used a newly devised yardstick in which the higher the score, the more severe the alteration. Discomfort was assessed at T1 and T2 using a visual analog scale. The Mann-Whitney U test was performed at the 5% level of significance.

Results

Of 60 patients, 42 were eligible, and 35 were randomly selected to have one side of the mouth receive the intervention. Two patients discontinued the intervention at T1, and 5 stopped at T2. Seven additional patients were recruited and completed all time points. Thus, 42 patients participated at T0, 40 at T1, and 35 at T2. Thirty-five patients participated at all time points. At T1, no statistically significant difference in terms of mucosa alteration was observed between the 2 sides (median of all differences [MD], 0.0; 95% CI, 0.0-1.0; P = 0.11). The same occurred at T2 (MD, 0.0; 95% CI, 0.0-0.0; P = 1.00). The comfort level was statistically higher at T1 on the shielded side (MD, 14.0; 95% CI, 1.0-36.0; P = 0.04), whereas no difference was observed at T2 (MD, 0.0; 95% CI, 0.0-1.0, P = 0.81). No serious harm was observed.

Conclusions

The customized bracket shields were effective in reducing discomfort during the first 3 days of orthodontic treatment despite no significant difference in terms of visible mucosa alteration.

Thursday, December 17, 2015

UCLA study clarifies the oral consequences of methamphetamine abuse



FINDINGS
A multidisciplinary group of researchers from the UCLA School of Dentistry, the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Program have published new findings that provide conclusive evidence of disproportionately high rates of dental disease in methamphetamine abusers.
In the largest study of meth abusers to date, Dr. Vivek Shetty and his colleagues systematically investigated the patterns and severity of dental disease in 571 methamphetamine abusers. The team found that over 96 percent of those studied experienced dental cavities and 58 percent had untreated tooth decay. Only 23 percent retained all of their natural teeth, compared 48 percent for the general population in the U.S.
The study also found that women methamphetamine abusers had higher rates of tooth loss and decay, as well as a greater prevalence of cavities in the front teeth.
The researchers also looked at the rate of periodontitis — serious gum infection that can lead to tooth loss — among methamphetamine abusers. They found that it was unusually high, with more than 89 percent showing total periodontitis. Methamphetamine abusers who were older, who were African American or who smoked cigarettes were more likely to suffer from severe periodontitis.
The study also found that 40 percent of the methamphetamine abusers were self-conscious or embarrassed about the condition of their teeth or dentures.
IMPACT
The study provides valuable research and public health insight into the oral health of methamphetamine abusers and informs general health providers and addiction specialists about the oral health problems in meth abusers. The prevalence and patterns of dental and periodontal disease could alert dentists to undisclosed methamphetamine use in their patients and help in the development of treatment plans.
The high rates of dental disease and the concerns about dental appearance among methamphetamine abusers could be used by dentists as the basis for screening, brief behavioral interventions and referrals for treatment.
BACKGROUND
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, over 12 million people have tried methamphetamines at least once. The consequences of abusing this drug can include mental disorders, extreme weight loss, skin sores and severe dental problems, known as “meth mouth.” Prior to this study, the evidence for meth mouth was largely anecdotal.
AUTHOR
The study’s first author and principal investigator is Dr. Vivek Shetty, professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery at the UCLA School of Dentistry.

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Meidcare decsion put off again until June 2016


The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services has extended the enforcement date to June 1, 2016, as the day by which dentists must have either enrolled or officially opted out of Medicare in order for prescriptions they write to be covered by Medicare Part D. The recommendation is that dentists submit their application at least 90-120 days before this date to allow sufficient time for processing.
Dentists who treat Medicare eligible patients have three options when delivering dental care to this population. A dentist must do one of the following:
  • Enroll as a Medicare provider to bill (covered dental procedures, flu vaccinations, participate in Medicaid managed care)
  • Enroll as a Medicare provider to refer and prescribe or
  • Opt out of the Medicare program.
All three of the above options will allow a dental provider to refer a patient for lab testing and will allow the pharmacy/patient to be reimbursed for prescriptions covered under Medicare when the rule is enforced in June 2016.
“Opting out” is not an option for any provider who treats patients having a Medicare Advantage (MA) dental plan and wishes their patients to receive the benefit from their dental plan. This is true whether the provider is in-network for the plan or not (for PPO-type plans). Remember, if a dentist has already opted out, they can revert their decision within 90 days. Enrolling either using the 855i (provider) or the 855o (to refer and prescribe) are valid options for a dentist treating patients with MA. If a non-contracted dentist enrolls in Medicare using the 855i, this does not mean the dentist is now a MA plan participant (i.e. in-network) for the plan.
MA plans are sold by private carriers (Aetna, Humana, etc.) and often offer routine dental coverage.
A dentist that takes NO action and prescribes medication to a Medicare Part D beneficiary or refers the patient for lab testing/imaging service on or after June 1, 2016, will place an undue burden on his/her patient. By taking no action, the patient will be responsible for payment that would otherwise be covered by Medicare benefits.

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Stopping tooth decay wihtout a drill




A University of Sydney study has revealed that tooth decay (dental caries) can be stopped, reversed, and prevented without the need for the traditional 'fill and drill' approach that has dominated dental care for decades.

The results of the seven year study, published today in Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, found that the need for fillings was reduced by 30 to 50 per cent through preventative oral care.

"It's unnecessary for patients to have fillings because they're not required in many cases of dental decay," said the study's lead author, Associate Professor Wendell Evans of the University of Sydney.
"This research signals the need for a major shift in the way tooth decay is managed by dentists -- dental practice in Australia needs to change. Our study shows that a preventative approach has major benefits compared to current practice.

"For a long time it was believed that tooth decay was a rapidly progressive phenomenon and the best way to manage it was to identify early decay and remove it immediately in order to prevent a tooth surface from breaking up into cavities. After removing the decay, the affected tooth is then restored with a filling material -- this process is sometimes referred to as 'drilling and filling'.

"However, 50 years of research studies have shown that decay is not always progressive and develops more slowly than was previously believed. For example, it takes an average of four to eight years for decay to progress from the tooth's outer layer (enamel) to the inner layer (dentine).

"That is plenty of time for the decay to be detected and treated before it becomes a cavity and requires a filling."

Professor Wendell Evans and his team developed the Caries Management System (CMS) -- a set of protocols which cover the assessment of decay risk, the interpretation of dental X-rays, and specific treatment of early decay (decay that is not yet a cavity).

The CMS treatment 'no-drill' involves four aspects:
1. Application of high concentration fluoride varnish by dentists to the sites of early decay
2. Attention to home tooth brushing skills
3. Restriction of between-meal snacks and beverages containing added sugar
4. Risk-specific monitoring.M/ul>
"The CMS was first tested on high risk patients at Westmead Hospital with great success," said Professor Evans.
"It showed that early decay could be stopped and reversed and that the need for drilling and filling was reduced dramatically.
"A tooth should be only be drilled and filled where an actual hole-in-the-tooth (cavity) is already evident," he said.
The CMS treatment was then tested in general dental practices in New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory. The Monitor Practice Program (MPP), funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC), confirmed that after seven years, decay risk was substantially reduced among the CMS patients and their need for fillings was reduced by 30 to 50 per cent compared to the control group.
"The reduced decay risk and reduced need for fillings was understandably welcomed by patients," Professor Evans said. "However, patients play an important role in their treatment. This treatment will need a partnership between dentists and patients to be most successful."
The white patches are signs of early decay that can be stopped and reversed before they become cavities (brown patch on tooth on the right).
Credit: University of Sydney

Monday, December 14, 2015

3M Helps Dentists Make Great First Impressions


Digital Guide offers practical solutions to common issues

ST. PAUL, Minn. – (December 2, 2015) – Making a great first impression matters. Especially for dentists and dental lab professionals involved with creating the highest possible quality dental restorations for patients. If a dental impression is taken improperly, it means repeat visits for the patient and dentist, because dental labs may not be able to create a quality final restoration. Bad impressions get sent back by the dental lab to the dental office to be remade or adjusted. This amounts to a significant source of productivity and revenue loss for the dental practice.
Capturing the ideal impression can be a challenge for even the most seasoned dental professional, but there are a number of simple tips and best practices that can greatly improve outcomes. To help improve impression taking skills, 3M Oral Care has updated its 3M Impression Troubleshooting Guide. With the newly optimized online guide, dentists can feel confident throughout the impression taking process, helping to ensure accurate outcomes each and every time.
The Impression Troubleshooting Guide is an interactive digital tool allowing dentists to quickly find answers to 12 of the most common issues in the impression taking procedure, with instant access to the corresponding solution. The guide also contains links to educational resources including instructional videos and technical data to further support proper technique.
“Taking impressions can be tricky because there are many variables in the process. This visual guide offers me practical advice on how I can prevent typical problems that can occur during the impression taking process. It also provides solutions that allow me to create highly detailed and accurate impressions, on the first try,” said Dr. James Braun, D.D.S., M.S. “Besides offering some of the most advanced and highest quality impression materials available, 3M supports my practice by providing me highly relevant clinical education tools, like the Impression Troubleshooting Guide.”
Making a great impression the first time leads to happier patients and a better procedure for all those involved. View the Impression Troubleshooting Guide today at http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/201647O/making-better-impressions-troubleshooting-guide.pdf.
###

Friday, December 11, 2015

Facial and Dental Injuries Facial and Dental Injuries in Karate.

Swiss Dent J. 2015;125(7-8):810-4.

Abstract

Karate is a martial art that carries a high trauma risk. Trauma-related Swiss and European karate data are currently unavailable. This survey seeks to increase knowledge of the incidence of traumatic facial and dental injuries, their emergency management, awareness of tooth rescue boxes, the use of mouthguards and their modifications. Interviews were conducted with 420 karate fighters from 43 European countries using a standardized questionnaire. All the participants were semi-professionals. The data were evaluated with respect to gender, kumite level (where a karate practitioner trains against an adversary), and country. Of the 420 fighters interviewed, 213 had experienced facial trauma and 44 had already had dental trauma. A total of 192 athletes had hurt their opponent by inflicting a facial or dental injury, and 290 knew about the possibility of tooth replantation following an avulsion. Only 50 interviewees knew about tooth rescue boxes. Nearly all the individuals interviewed wore a mouthguard (n = 412), and 178 of them had made their own modifications to the guard. The results of the present survey suggest that more information and education in wearing protective gear are required to reduce the incidence of dental injuries in karate.

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Wound management and the use of mouth rinse in mandibular third molar surgery.

Swiss Dent J. 2015;125(10):1085-93.

Abstract

The aim of this survey was to assess the knowledge and practice of Swiss dentists regarding wound management and the use of mouth rinse in surgical removal of mandibular third molars (MTM). A postal survey was conducted among all 3,288 dentists who are members of the Swiss Dental Society (SSO) representing the majority of dentists in Switzerland. The questionnaire consisted of 13 questions with mostly multiple-choice answers. Demographic profile, surgical experience, the use of antibiotics, and wound management, i.e. wound closure and the use of mouth rinse were assessed. The response rate was 55%. Semi-closed (59.1%), closed (19%) and open wound management (11.7%) were applied most often. Semi-closed wound management was preferred in the German-speaking region (67%) and closed wound management was preferred in the French-speaking region (55%). For semi-closed wound healing, drains impregnated with terra-cortril (42%) and iodoform-Vaseline (40%) were used. For closed wound management, most dentists reported leaving the wound to heal with the blood clot only (60.5%). Most dentists (74.5%) prescribed chlorhexidine 0.2% (CHX) mouth rinse when performing MTM surgery and a combination of immediate preoperative and postoperative use was preferred. Semi-closed wound management with drain and CHX mouth rinse is frequently used in Switzerland in the perioperative management in MTM surgery. It is a well-documented procedure leading to favourable outcomes without using any systemic antibiotics. However, wound management techniques differ between the three linguistic regions.

Wednesday, December 09, 2015

UCLA study clarifies the oral consequences of methamphetamine abuse

FINDINGS
A multidisciplinary group of researchers from the UCLA School of Dentistry, the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Program have published new findings that provide conclusive evidence of disproportionately high rates of dental disease in methamphetamine abusers.
In the largest study of meth abusers to date, Dr. Vivek Shetty and his colleagues systematically investigated the patterns and severity of dental disease in 571 methamphetamine abusers. The team found that over 96 percent of those studied experienced dental cavities and 58 percent had untreated tooth decay. Only 23 percent retained all of their natural teeth, compared 48 percent for the general population in the U.S.
The study also found that women methamphetamine abusers had higher rates of tooth loss and decay, as well as a greater prevalence of cavities in the front teeth.
The researchers also looked at the rate of periodontitis — serious gum infection that can lead to tooth loss — among methamphetamine abusers. They found that it was unusually high, with more than 89 percent showing total periodontitis. Methamphetamine abusers who were older, who were African American or who smoked cigarettes were more likely to suffer from severe periodontitis.
The study also found that 40 percent of the methamphetamine abusers were self-conscious or embarrassed about the condition of their teeth or dentures.
IMPACT
The study provides valuable research and public health insight into the oral health of methamphetamine abusers and informs general health providers and addiction specialists about the oral health problems in meth abusers. The prevalence and patterns of dental and periodontal disease could alert dentists to undisclosed methamphetamine use in their patients and help in the development of treatment plans.
The high rates of dental disease and the concerns about dental appearance among methamphetamine abusers could be used by dentists as the basis for screening, brief behavioral interventions and referrals for treatment.
BACKGROUND
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, over 12 million people have tried methamphetamines at least once. The consequences of abusing this drug can include mental disorders, extreme weight loss, skin sores and severe dental problems, known as “meth mouth.” Prior to this study, the evidence for meth mouth was largely anecdotal.

Tuesday, December 08, 2015

DentalEZ® Integrated Solutions Expands its Specialty Offerings with the New DentalEZ® Ortho Cart




DentalEZ® Ortho Cart Unveiled at this Year’s Greater New York Dental Meeting

Malvern, PA (November 30, 2015) – DentalEZ®, a supplier of integrated products and services for dental health professionals worldwide, recently unveiled its new Ortho Cart at this year’s Greater New York Dental Meeting. Designed to make orthodontic procedures fast and easy, the Ortho Cart is the latest addition to the Company’s growing line of DentalEZ Equipment Solutions.

Designed exclusively for orthodontic professionals, the DentalEZ® Ortho Cart is equipped with numerous features and benefits geared toward enabling optimum orthodontic practice. DentalEZ Ortho Carts are ergonomically crafted to make orthodontic practice comfortable and efficient for orthodontic practitioners and their patients. 

At the heart of the Ortho Cart is a strong, durably designed cabinet with an aesthetically pleasing appearance. Available in either a mobile or fixed version, the Ortho Cart is equipped with four caster wheels that facilitate smooth, glide-like positioning. UL safety approved, the Ortho Cart dons a laminate flat top design with rounded corners for ideal positioning amidst a busy operatory environment. An optional solid surface top is also available upon request.

The Ortho Cart is equipped with a spacious Metabox drawer system comprised of two deep drawers and three shallow drawers. Moreover, an expandable pullout work surface provides an extra working area when additional room is needed. 
The strategically placed delivery unit of the Ortho Cart accommodates both doctor and assistant instrumentation. Ergonomically designed for optimum access, the handpiece base is positioned at an easily accessible 45° angle, while accompanying handpiece holders are located at a convenient universal height suitable for all operator positions. The delivery unit comes standard with two handpiece tubings, one syringe, one HVE and one SE. In addition, the delivery unit is equipped with a clean water system housed in an easy access side door, a solids collector, and an oil collector.

Additional optional features include an air vent for CPU exhaust, a monitor mount, a duplex outlet, and an optional third handpiece as well as fiber optics.

For more information about the new DentalEZ Ortho Carts, please visit www.dentalez.com. 

About DentalEZ®

DentalEZ® is committed to advancing the practice of dentistry through fully integrated products and services. Encompassing five distinct product categories—StarDental®, DentalEZ®, RAMVAC®, NevinLabs, and Columbia Dentoform®—DentalEZ® manufactures everything in the operatory, from handpieces to chairs to vacuum systems to dental simulation models, creating a complete line of products to elevate the health, comfort, and efficiency of the dental operatory. For more information, please visit www.dentalez.com.

# # #

Monday, December 07, 2015

Ransomware and your dental office- No Charge Check

 There recently was a segment on Good Morning America about Ransomware. Here is a link to the segment
http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/security-experts-warn-ransomware-attacks-grow-2016-35506236

Ransomeware is a type of malicious software designed to block access to a computer system until a sum of money is paid. Your entire server hard drive becomes encrypted and you have to pay the attacker in Bitcoin. In most cases this will take days and then you have to hope that the attacker send you the key to unlock the encryption. In the mean time your system is down. Backups may not be of help as they may be infected as well. You need to be very careful when downloading files and email attachments in your office.  Ransomware has attacked dental offices.


You should have your system checked. DDS Rescue is offering a "NO CHARGE" and NO OBLIGATION" data security assessment. This service is being sponsored by Patterson and Benco. I use DDS Rescue in my office and I sleep better because of it.



Call or email them today
Telephone:(800) 998 9048
E-mail: sales@ddsrescue.com

Friday, December 04, 2015

DentalEZ® Introduces the StarDental® iStar Cordless Hygiene Prophy Handpiece at GNYDM




Special $100 Discount for all Purchases Through January 2016

Malvern, PA (November 30, 2015) – DentalEZ®, a supplier of integrated products and services for dental health professionals worldwide, is pleased to introduce the StarDental® iStar Cordless Prophy Handpiece. Designed to make dental hygiene procedures fast and easy, the iStar is the first true cordless prophy handpiece that allows full freedom of movement and freedom for each dental professional to choose his or her preferred disposable angle.

The lightweight, well-balanced, cordless design of the iStar is ergonomically designed for optimum freedom of movement and comfortable use. Free of extraneous handpiece tubing, the iStar relieves wrist stress caused by cord drag while providing superior accessibility with less effort to posterior regions during prophylaxis procedures. Moreover, the need for a foot pedal is eliminated, freeing the user of extra operatory obstacles. The iStar also comes with a storable charger and 100 disposable sleeves.

With the highest torque (2.0 Ncm) of any cordless prophy handpiece currently available, the iStar is equipped with consistent steadfast power comparable to air-driven handpieces. The unwavering stable rotation provides reliable and comfortable operation for fast, effective dental hygiene procedures.

Operated by an easily accessed single multi-function button, the iStar offers multiple speed settings. A 5-speed control of 500 – 2,500 rotations per minute allows for numerous procedures to be performed from tooth polishing to treatment with seamless automatic speed adjustment, with a battery that delivers 3 continuous hours of use.

The required disposable sleeves are custom fit to the iStar, available now and packaged in boxes of 500. The iStar carries a 1 year limited warranty on system and 3 year limited warranty on battery.
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Special Notice: Dental professionals who purchase the iStar between now and January 31st, 2016 will receive a special discounted rate of $100 off retail cost.

For more information about the new iStar cordless prophy handpiece, please visit www.dentalez.com. 

About DentalEZ®
DentalEZ® Integrated Solutions is committed to advancing the practice of dentistry through fully integrated products and services. Encompassing five distinct product categories—StarDental®, DentalEZ®, RAMVAC®, NevinLabs, and Columbia Dentoform®—DentalEZ® manufactures everything in the operatory, from handpieces to chairs to vacuum systems to dental simulation models, creating a complete line of products to elevate the health, comfort, and efficiency of the dental operatory. For more information, please visit www.dentalez.com.

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Thursday, December 03, 2015

KaVo Kerr Group Provides Product and Volunteers to ADA 2015 Mission of Mercy Event



First Mission of Mercy event in Washington, DC serves 700+ patients.
WASHINGTON, DC — (November 30, 2015) A cross-section of impressive imaging-related technologies from KaVo Kerr Group were put to use by hundreds of dental professionals who volunteered with the Mission of Mercy event hosted by the American Dental Association in cooperation with the District of Columbia Dental Society. Headquartered in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center as part of ADA 2015 — America’s Dental Meeting, this was the first Mission of Mercy event to take place in Washington, DC.
Held Nov. 8, 2015, the free one-day dental clinic employed hundreds of volunteers to serve more than 700 patients in providing approximately $460,000 in care. KaVo Kerr Group supported the clinic with intra-oral X-ray, pan and caries detection products provided by DEXISTM, Instrumentarium DentalTM and NOMADTM. Teams of volunteers from DEXIS and Instrumentarium also donated their time and expertise to the event.
“The solutions provided by KaVo Kerr Group allow us to serve 99% of dental practices around the world. It is meaningful for those of us who are part of KaVo Kerr Group to participate in events like Mission of Mercy in order to see the individual faces of that 99% and, more importantly, the patients who benefit from our products,” said Candy Ross, KaVo Kerr Group’s Director of Industry and Professional Relations for Dental Technologies, North America. “We talk a lot about trust as a core value in our company. It is trust in the products themselves, and trust in our organization to show up for events like this so that smart innovation makes it into the hands of compassionate dental professionals committed to doing good.”
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Wednesday, December 02, 2015

Kerr TotalCare Partners with OSAP to Promote the Safest Dental Visit



Program educates stakeholders throughout the dental industry on the importance of infection control.
November 23, 2015. Kerr TotalCare is proud to announce its support for The Organization for Safety, Asepsis and Prevention (OSAP) and its Safest Dental VisitTM program. The Safest Dental Visit is a collaborative effort to support an increased commitment to infection control and safety in dentistry. Dental professionals, thought leaders and key influencers across the industry are joining forces to help ensure that every visit is the safest dental visit for patients and providers.
Each stakeholder — clinicians, educators, consultants and dental trade – each have resources specifically tailored to support their role in this vital program.
“Infection control is a critically important topic that touches every dental professional and patient,” said Phil Prentice, Vice President, North American Marketing, Kerr. “The Kerr TotalCare team is proud of our highly effective suite of Infection Prevention products, and this partnership with OSAP allows us to support not only innovation, but education.”
“Kerr TotalCare has been a dedicated OSAP member for nearly two decades,” added Therese Long, Executive Director. “Kerr’s support, which is now at the Super Sponsor level, is particularly vital as we expand the reach of the Safest Dental Visit, our comprehensive program designed to increase commitment to infection control and safety in dentistry. Kerr’s ongoing support of OSAP demonstrates the level of commitment from Kerr TotalCare to infection prevention and to our mutual goal of ensuring that every visit is the safest dental visit for patients and providers.”
For more information about Kerr TotalCare, visit http://www.kerrdental.com/kerr-totalcare. ###
About Kerr Corporation
For nearly 125 years, Kerr has been serving the comprehensive needs of the entire dental care community in pursuit of enhancing oral health. Individual Kerr brands are encompassed within the Kerr Restoratives, Kerr Endodontics, Kerr Rotary, and Kerr TotalCare platforms. By providing best-in-class, patient-based solutions, we believe that in partnership with those we serve - “Together we’re more.”
Visit us at www.kerrdental.com or call 800-KERR123.

Tuesday, December 01, 2015

Core3daCADemyTM Unveils New Hands-on Courses for Spring 2016!



Las Vegas, NV – November 25, 2015 - Core3daCADemyTM, the educational arm of Core3dcentres®, is pleased to unveil a whole slate of exciting New Hands-on Courses for Spring 2016!
Held in Las Vegas, Calgary and Toronto, all Core3daCADemyTM two-day courses are designed by dental technicians for dental technicians, feature a smaller class size ensuring a dedicated hands-on experience along with lecture-style instruction, and are packed with tips and tricks that will increase participant’s design efficiency, thus increasing their profitability.
Please join Core3daCADemyTM for:
"Accuracy and Efficiencies in 3Shape"
February 5-6, 2016 (Calgary, AB) March 4-5, 2016 (Toronto, ON)
May 20-21, 2016 (Las Vegas, NV) November 18-19, 2016 (Calgary, AB)

"Digital Abutment and Implant Bar/Bridge Designs"
January 29-30, 2016 (Las Vegas, NV) April 15-16, 2016 (Calgary, AB)
May 6-7, 2016 (Toronto, ON) September 23-24 (Las Vegas, NV)

"Advanced Cosmetics and Customization in 3Shape"
March 11-12, 2016 (Las Vegas, NV) September 16-17, 2016 (Calgary, AB) October 28-29, 2016 (Toronto, ON) November 4-5, 2016 (Las Vegas, NV)
Under the direction of Mark Ferguson, Digital Integration Specialist, Core3dcentres, participants in the series gain a comprehensive understanding of design essentials from custom abutment and Full Contour Screw Retained Bars right up to Advanced Scanning and how it relates to Advanced Cosmetic cases and Smile Design!
Core3daCADemyTM is also hosting a wide variety of in-depth technical webinars over the coming months. Available free of charge, feel free to join us for:
  •   "It's All About that Base!" (January 20, 2016)
  •   “Adapting To and Thriving In The World of Digital Laboratory Workflows” (February
    17, 2016)
    All Webinars are offered at the same time on each date: 12:00 Noon EDT 10:00AM MDT 9:00AM PDT. Core3daCADemyTM also maintains a large library of past Webinar topics on our website. Please go to www.core3dcentres.com and click on Core3daCADemy, Webinars to view the entire title list.
    Core3daCADemyTM offers a wide range of courses on-site at your laboratory and presentations with a variety of dental organizations. For more information, upcoming Webinar topics and dates, or Course schedules and Registration information (or to arrange for course delivery at your laboratory), please visit www.core3dcentres.com or contact Emily Bradley, Director at Core3daCADemyTM toll-free at 888-750-9204 or by email ebradley@core3dcentres-na.com.

Outcomes of direct pulp capping: interrogating an insurance database

I find this very interesting and not sure about the size of the pulp exposures. MJ

Raedel M, Hartmann A, Bohm S, Konstantinidis I, Priess HW, Walter MH. Outcomes of direct pulp capping: interrogating an insurance database. International Endodontic Journal.

Abstract

Aim

To evaluate the effectiveness of direct pulp capping under general practice conditions. It was hypothesized that direct pulp capping is an effective procedure in the majority of cases and prevents the need for root canal treatment or extraction.

Methodology

Claims data were collected from the digital database of a major German national health insurance company. Only patients who had been insurance members for the entire 3 year period 2010 to 2012 were eligible. Kaplan–Meier survival analyses were conducted for all teeth with direct pulp capping. Success was defined as not undergoing root canal treatment. Survival was defined as not undergoing extraction. Differences between survival functions were tested with the log rank test.

Results

A total of 148 312 teeth were included. The overall success rate was 71.6% at 3 years. The overall survival rate was 95.9% at 3 years. The success rates for single-rooted teeth (71.8%) and multirooted teeth (71.5%) were similar although significantly different (P < 0.001). Best 3-year success rates were found at low (79.7%; <18 age="" and="" high="" nbsp="" very="" years.="">85 years.).

Conclusions

After direct pulp capping, more than two-thirds of the affected teeth did not undergo root canal treatment within 3 years. Although this study has the typical limits of a claims data analysis, it can be concluded that direct pulp capping is an effective intervention to avoid root canal treatment and extraction in a general practice setting.